The Covid Vaccine and Blood Clots

Much of the world is sitting here, watching with hope as the vaccines are rolled out for Covid-19. Yes, there are pandemic deniers, vaccine deniers and general conspiracy theory people, but then aren’t there always when anything to do with the pandemic is mentioned.

So let’s just ignore them for the sake of clarity and common sense simplicity.

The topic du jour for the past week has been the blood clots that can be a rare side affect of the AstraZeneca vaccine. I’ve been following the discussion closely, partly to watch how the authorities handle the public perception. The vaccine is vital for the world to start getting back to some semblance of normality in anything less than 5 years. We most certainly don’t want a repeat of the Spanish flu 100 years ago, where 50 million people died and the world was devastated for something like 5 years, until the virus mutated and became less deadly and the fabled herd immunity could only come about by enough people getting sick then recovering. Here in the modern world, with the science and knowledge that we have now, mankind is able to create vaccines. This will help save 10’s of millions of people who otherwise would be doomed to die.

One of the points being made by the experts, as they try to calm some members of the public, is that the numbers of people who have developed blood clots so far are in reality vanishingly small. I’ve forgotten the exact numbers, but it’s something like 17 people out of 20 million vaccinations. A number of experts have said that you are more likely to get hit by lightening than have a blood clot from the vaccine.

But of course nobody is listening to this little common sense fact. Keep in mind that dying from a blood clot is a small percentage of even getting one. So a small percentage of a vanishingly small percentage.

Another point that is being made by the experts is that the benefit that people will get from the vaccine far outweighs the risk of getting a blood clot. This is a good point and again, common sense. And it got me thinking.

I live with Typ1 1 Diabetes. Four times every day, I inject myself with insulin. If I don’t have the insulin, then my life expectancy is measured in weeks. It is 100% guaranteed that I will die within weeks if I don’t have my insulin. I repeat, 100% guaranteed.

BUT, here’s the thing. Insulin is one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century, which has saved the lives of millions of people over the last 100 years. But it is not mentioned in polite conversation that insulin is also potentially very dangerous, if used incorrectly. But for a person who has insulin regularly, it doesn’t even have to be used incorrectly to be dangerous. Keep in mind as I type this that if a person with type 1 diabetes doesn’t have their insulin, their life expectancy is measured in weeks.

If a person who uses insulin has the correct amount at the correct time, under the correct circumstances, but then doesn’t eat enough carbohydrate, that person’s life expectancy could be measured in hours, not weeks. I kid you not; I know from personal experience.

So not only does their life depend on insulin, but the insulin has the power to kill them. The ONLY difference is the time frame. In one case, ie no insulin, death is 100% guaranteed within a period of weeks. In the other case, ie. no carbohydrate, death is almost inevitable within a period of hours. There would need to be a string of other circumstances for that to happen, but the important parts of the story are the insulin and no carbohydrate.

So, taking the insulin story and laying it over the top of the Covid vaccine story, why is there so much drama going on about the vaccine and blood clots? The numbers are vanishingly small, the chances are nowhere near guaranteed, but the benefits are without question.

Really people, get a grip. Listen to the experts, look at the maths, open your eyes and think of your fellow humans.

HAVE THE DAMNED VACCINE or move out of the way of the rest of us, who just want life to get back to normal. And thank your conspiracy-believing stars that you don’t have type 1 diabetes.